Lowering peak energy demand with a bank of lead-acid batteries in the basement

Background: For stationary storage in a moderate climate, such as in a basement, lead-acid batteries still have a total cost of ownership comparable to lithium-ion batteries.

According to Samantha Page

In the basement garage of a high-end apartment building in the middle of New York City, a few electricians are quietly installing a century-old product that is now poised to revolutionize an industry — and maybe lead the United States into a carbon-neutral future.

Taking up about two parking spaces is a wall of boxes. They are simple lead-acid batteries, similar to what keeps the lights on in your car. But these batteries are linked together, connected to the building’s electricity system, and monitored in real time by a Washington-state based company, Demand Energy. Demand’s installation at the Paramount Building in midtown Manhattan is going to lower the building electricity bills and reduce its carbon footprint, even while it doesn’t reduce a single watt of use.

Every night, the batteries charge up. Every day, they run down, providing a small portion of the building’s energy and reducing the amount of power it takes off the grid. This cycle of charging during low-use times and discharging during high use times helps level out the Paramount’s electricity use.

and

American home bills usually have a flat rate for the amount of electricity the resident uses. No matter when it’s used, or how quickly power is drawn, the rate is the same amount per kilowatt hour. Flat rates are like an odometer saying how many miles were drive — or, in this case, how many kilowatt hours (kWh) have been used. But for commercial and industrial properties, including residential apartment buildings, the electricity bill also has a demand charge. The demand charge acts like a speedometer: Not only is a business charged for the total amount of electricity it uses, it is also charged for how quickly power is taken. A business will receive a higher bill for using 10 kWh in an hour than for using the same 10 kWh over, say 10 hours. In New York, demand charges make up, on average, half of commercial and industrial customers’ bills.

Electricity rates are designed like this because utilities don’t like peaks in demand. Peaking plants are expensive, wasteful, and dirty. But from the utility’s perspective, putting a lot of electricity on the grid is also bad news. The higher the peak demand, the more infrastructure — wires, generators — has to be built. And transmission congestion means a less efficient system. (Line loss, a phenomenon in which not all the electricity gets from point A to point B, is greater when the transmission system is overloaded). Not to mention the risks of brownouts and blackouts that increase with too much strain on the grid.

Cold fusion — “Rydberg Matter explains the impossible chemistry”

A recent article (HERE) by Per Kristian Bjørkeng in Norway’s largest newspaper the Aftenposten, as translated by Russ George, that

features an interview with Physicist Sindre Zeiner-Gundersen, who revealed details of an operating experimental cold fusion device in Norway generating 20 times more energy than required to activate it!

According to Scandinavian physicists ‘cold fusion’ happens due to the formation of ultradense hydrogen/deuterium as described in the widely acclaimed work and theoretical understanding by professor Svein Olafsson (Sindre’s Ph.D. supervisor in Iceland) and Norway’s Professor Svein Holmlid.

Earth’s surface will soak up even less CO2 in the years ahead

The overflowing CO2 bathtub, according to the US EPA

According to Joe Romm in “How Can Global CO2 Levels Soar When Emissions Are Flat?

A crucial point is that, based on actual observations and measurements, the world’s top carbon cycle experts have determined that the land and oceans are becoming steadily less effective at removing excess CO2 from the atmosphere, as I reported last year. This makes it more urgent for us to start cutting carbon pollution ASAP, since it will become progressively harder and harder for us to do so effectively in the coming decades.

In particular, the defrosting permafrost and the resultant release of CO2 and methane turns part of the land sink into a source of airborne greenhouse gases. Similarly, as global warming increases forest and peatland fires — burning trees and vegetation — that also turns one part of the land carbon sink into a source of atmospheric CO2. So does ever-worsening droughts that scientists are observing in the United States southwest and other parts of the world.

We are destroying nature’s ability to help us stave off catastrophic climate change.

Historic event: One-year 1 megawatt E-Cat trial completed

AN IMPOSSIBLE INVENTION

Drawing of the 1MW plant. Drawing of the 1MW plant.

On February 17, 2016, a 350-day commercial test of a one megawatt heat plant based on Andrea Rossi’s E-Cat was completed. The event must be considered historic since it’s the first time an industrially useful amount of energy is produced over such a long time from this kind of yet unexplained radiation-free nuclear reaction—LENR or Low Energy Nuclear Reactions.

To be clear, the report from the one-year trial, which has been controlled by a major independent third party certification institute, will be released only in about a month, and until then no official information is provided on the test result. However, multiple sources have told me that the test has been successful.

Earlier, some sources having visited the test plant told me that the COP, Coefficient of Performance, i.e. the ratio between output power and input power for control, was in the range 20—80, meaning that the…

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The age of fossil fuels is ending

According to Joe Romm in “In Historic Paris Climate Deal, World Unanimously Agrees To Not Burn Most Fossil Fuels

The economic and environmental implications of this deal for Americans are staggering. In the near term, it will unlock an accelerating multi-trillion-dollar shift in capital investment away from carbon-intensive coal and oil, which were the cornerstone of the first industrial revolution, into clean technologies like solar, wind, LED lighting, advanced batteries, and electric cars. It means far less harmful carbon pollution will be emitted in the coming years.

The agreement “sends a very powerful message to the business and investment community that the age of fossil fuels is ending,” explained the Union of Concerned Scientists’ Alden Meyer. Thus, “continued investments in high-carbon assets conflicts with their fiduciary responsibility.”

Replicating cold fusion — according to US Navy

According to “Louis DeChiaro of US Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) on Replicating Pons and Fleischmann

In like manner, the Naval Research Labs (NRL) ran over 300 experiments using pure Pd cathodes, all of them yielding negative results. Then somebody suggested that NRL should try an alloy of 90% Pd and 10% Rh. The very first such alloy cathode they tried yielded over 10,000 Joules of excess thermal energy – all from less than 1 gram of cathode material. I ran Density Functional Theory simulations on that alloy, and it, too, satisfies all the conditions given above, while pure Pd and pure Rh do not.

NRL christened this cathode with the name Eve, after the obvious Biblical analogy. I’m pleased to share the news that Eve had a number of “sisters” who produced equal and even greater excess thermal energy, among a number of other more interesting effects. Finally, I can observe that the materials simulations now make it fairly easy to evaluate any given solid lattice material and estimate its level of LENR activity. We have good correlations between the simulation results and the known levels of experimentally-determined LENR activity in a number of different alloys whose dominant elements come from the Transition Metal Group of the Periodic Table. Hopefully, we will be able to get all the details of this material released for publication to the general public over the next few weeks.

US Navy cold fusion presentation

According to Frank Acland

An interesting presentation has been uploaded on the LENR-Forum which was given by Louis F. DeChiaro, Ph.D, a physicist with the US Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA), Dahlgren Warefare Center. The presentation was given at a IEEE Meeting on “LENR Phenomena and Potential Applications” held on Sept. 23 2015 at Teradyne in North Reading, Massachusetts.

The full slideshow can be accessed here: http://www.lenr-forum.com/forum/index.php/Attachment/386-IEEE-brief-DeChiaro-9-2015-pdf/

Conclusuons

An impossible invention: Mats Lewan’s true story of the energy source that could change the world

Update 2: Reviews and author interview HERE.

Update 1: Controversial Nobel physicist Brian Josephson recommended Lewan’s book HERE.

According to physics journalist Mats Lewan regarding his new book An Impossible Invention (http://animpossibleinvention.com/)

Cold fusion is an energy source that could provide clean water to Planet Earth, zero-emission vehicles with unlimited mileage, a solution to the climate crisis and much more. It is clean, compact, simple, inexhaustible and . . . physically impossible. At least that is what science has considered since 1989.

But in January 2011 the Italian inventor Andrea Rossi demonstrated a sloppily-wrapped device that boiled water with heat emanating from something that seemed to be cold fusion.

Too good to be true, some said. Fraud, according to others.

A Swedish technology journalist was one of the few who chose to take Rossi seriously. In An Impossible Invention we follow his search for the truth about Rossi and the strange device — the E-Cat. He shows that the impossible seems to be possible, that the world faces fundamental change.

Mats Lewan is a technology and science journalist, author and speaker. He works as a staff writer at the Swedish technology magazine Ny Teknik and has worked internationally as a freelance journalist and reporter at CBS Cnet News. Lewan holds a Master of Science degree in Engineering Physics from the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden where he lives with his wife and two children.